Consumerism And Materialism In The Bookish Community // Bookworms Need Not Buy Books

Hey loves! Today, I’m writing a discussion that I’m actually lowkey terrified to post, but it’s something I’ve definitely thought about quite a bit, so I decided to just go for it! This post was in part inspired by the recent Top Ten Tuesday post, outrageous things I’ve done for the love of a book. Although I typically participate, I chose not to participate this week because I hadn’t done very many “outrageous” things. It wasn’t until I read through the post that I realized just how much of that is based on money. 

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I wanted to share a few examples of outrageous bookish things I saw in one or multiple posts that really stuck out to me because I know I would never do them because of money.

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Buying multiple editions of the same book because the covers don’t match/there is a special edition cover. This just seems…well, outrageous? Sometimes I just stare at covers because they’re so pretty, but not more than, say, an hour or so. Spending $20 on a special edition of a book I’m not going to read (especially if I’ve already read it, with a different cover edition just so I can stare at its pretty cover for an hour is something I can’t imagine spending my money on.

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Buying x number of books in one go. I love deals as much as the next person, and who can resist getting a ton of books for cheap–I feel so happy for people when I see they got deals! But I also have seen so many posts (and a lot on Booktube as well) about people who get, like 10 new hardcover books in one go at Barnes and Noble. That’s $200 in one go just on books…

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Buying a book just because of the cover. I don’t understand the rationale for doing this, particularly if it’s a book I’m not sure I’m going to enjoy. I have read books from the library just because of the cover, not gonna lie, but reading library books is free and I can’t fathom spending my money on a book I might not like, or might not even read, just because of the cover.

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Owning x number of unread books and still buying more. I just…how can you have so many unread books lying around on your bookshelves? I don’t understand blowing tens or hundreds of dollars on books and then leaving them unread for months on end. Personally, my bookshelf has 18 young adult books on it (and a few kid books and school books), and about 3/4 of those I didn’t pay for (ARCs or gifts). Needless to say, I’ve read every single one of those books, most of them multiple times, and whenever I get the change to get even one new book, it’s a super special, exciting occasion for me.

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Here’s the thing. I get most of my books from the library, and I’m so grateful for it. I know I’m extremely fortunate to have such a nice, large, easily accessible library close to where I live. However, there are definitely a few downfalls, things I miss out on, and insecurities that come with predominantly using the library rather than buying books as a book blogger.

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Being behind on new releases. I’m so privileged and fortunate to have an amazing library where I get 99% of my books, but with that comes with always being behind on new releases. My library ordered King of Scars in January, and I immediately put a hold on it, but it definitely didn’t arrive right when it came out, and then I had to get in line behind other people who put a hold on it. It’s now April, and I’m still patiently waiting, even though the hype has definitely died down and I’m left feeling like I missed out on something.

I feel this especially hard whenever it’s release day for a very hyped book (King of Scars, Wicked King, Archenemies, ACOFAS, to name a few) and my feed is full of people gushing about it, and I really really want both to just be able to read and enjoy it since I’m dying to know what happens, and to talk about it with other book bloggers!

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Not having books for bookstagram. Okay, here’s the truth: I would never be a bookstagramer anyways because I’m too lazy. But I did at one point try to take some pretty pictures for blog graphics, and realized that I had less than 18 YA books to work with (it was a while ago when I had fewer books). There are really only so many ways you can arrange 18 books… I know you can photograph library books, but I typically only have about ten of those checked out at a time, so that brings me up to 28, and you definitely can’t do those amazing book rainbows or all those other gorgeous pictures with just 18 books. And then there’s the fact that they all have that shiny plastic over, and the stickers on the spine, and some of them are beat up and dirty and creased…

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But the biggest reason of all is that sometimes it feels like you aren’t a real reader/bookworm if you don’t buy into this materialistic culture. I’ve seen so many posts that are like how much of a crazy reader are you? or you know you’re a bookworm when, and then proceeds to list many of the points I made above. And at the end, my result is that I’m not really a hardcore bookworm because I don’t buy 5 copies of the same book just for the cover or whatever.

Then there are the tags I’ve wanted to participate in…but couldn’t, or at least had to modify, because I don’t have enough books. My measly 18 books don’t have all the random ass qualities listed in bookshelf scavenger hunts, and I’ve certainly modified a few tags that have one of the rules “only use books you own” and just done books I’ve read from the library and don’t own.

Finally, I’ve felt shamed by people who basically imply I’m not supporting authors. I’ve felt shamed from people who say things like once you have an ARC, you still need to buy the book once it comes out to support the author. I would love to be able to do that, but I don’t have money to spend on a book I’ve already read and probably won’t read again. And if I did…I already have a copy… I know that I’m not giving the author any money from reading the ARC, but I still do promote it to my blog, reading out to other readers, and I feel like just because I can’t buy it, you shouldn’t act like I’m not helping… I also really want to participate in preorder campaigns and buy all the copies of the book, but I never do, and sometimes it feels like I’m a bad blogger or reader because I’m not supporting authors this way.

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Here’s the thing: a shiny new release from Barnes and Noble right when it comes out is about $20. And twenty dollars is a lot of money, especially for teenagers. Here are a few things I’m sure most teenagers including myself are much more likely to spend twenty dollars on than one single book:

  • Hanging out with friends and seeing a movie or grabbing lunch together
  • Buying clothes, including saving up for a prom dress!
  • All sorts of school fees such SAT and AP tests, college application fees, paying to send test scores/transcripts, or even more social things like going to football games, dances, and musicals.
  • Saving for the future! Saving up for our first car or that $30,000+/year college tuition.

I feel like my monetary struggles are especially prominent because I’m a teenager. I don’t have a job, and if I did, it would probably be a part time minimum wage job, and all the money I earned would go to the things I mentioned above. I know there are a lot of teens who do buy lots of books and merch and stuff, and if you have a job as a teen and spend that money on books, kudos to you! But I also know that most of my friends from high school are basically equally broke as me with very little money to put to books or optional things like that when we have college and its tuition jumping at us from every corner. So to me, it’s kind of ridiculous that teenagers might feel alienated from the bookish community that focuses largely on YA.

(I’d also like to take a moment to point out how there are stats showing that the majority of YA books are not bought by teens, and while that’s a post for another day, it’s worth thinking about that part of that might be because many teens just don’t have the funds to buy books).

And of course this post doesn’t just apply to teenagers! That’s what I’m focusing on because obviously that’s my experience as a teenager, but there are so many people who might not be able to buy many books. There are international readers who might not want to pay ridiculous shipping fees, or adults who might be struggling financially and  can’t afford to be buying so many books, or just people who could afford it but would rather spend their money on other things!

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In conclusion…this post has rambled on for much longer than I originally thought it would (1700 words?? what a monster i’ve written. and probably nobody will read this lmaoooo), but my point here is basically to bring awareness to the materialism present in the bookish community, and how it might alienate some readers, like me, who don’t buy into it.

I’m not in any way trying to shame readers for spending so much money on books. If you love books and choose to spend it that way, then you deserve many fantastic books and I have to say, your bookshelves look gorgeous!! It’s your money, and if buying books/bookish merch makes you happy, then I’m happy for you.

I just am trying to say that not everyone can afford to be like that. If you want to buy five editions of the same book, then that’s fine, but realize that for many people, that’s simply not possible. And sometimes, it can be hard here. But in the end, of course, I’m still endlessly grateful for my library that affords me the opportunity to read so many amazing books for free.

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Let’s Chat

Do you typically buy books, or get them from the library (or some other way)? What are your thoughts on materialism in the bookish community? I’d love to chat in the comments below ❤

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61 thoughts on “Consumerism And Materialism In The Bookish Community // Bookworms Need Not Buy Books

  1. YES this post is so spot on! I don’t buy most of the books I read – in fact, I buy only the smallest fraction of the books that I read. My method is to borrow from the library and then, if I absolutely adore a book and know I’ll want to reread it and lend it out to people, I buy a copy. This has certainly built up a collection larger than the average person over the years, but compared to a lot of other people in the book community, it feels tiny.
    Even though I’ve never been told explicitly told that I’m not a “real” book lover for not buying a ton of books, it’s hard not to feel that pressure when, as you said, many of the things that supposedly make you a book lover involve buying books. But you’re so right that this attitude completely alienates people who don’t have the money to spend on hardbacks all the time, or people who want to spend their money elsewhere! Even though I’m technically an adult, I still don’t feel like I have the funds to buy books at the rate that a lot of others do.
    Anyway, the point I was trying to make before I started rambling was that I completely agree with this post and I support your non-book buying lifestyle!! 👌

    Liked by 1 person

  2. DO NOT feel bad about not buying into the bookstagram hype. I am 28 and I have a stable career and I guess enough money to splurge on books every once and a while… I still buy second hand. I utilize my library and I really look for sales. I ask for gift cards for birthdays etc so that I can buy “special” editions. I found when I first started bookstagram I felt pressured into owning ALL of the new releases but it borderline bankrupt me! I really respect you for acknowledging this elephant in the room regarding over spending on books for aesthetic .. it’s something more people should talk about and not be embarrassed about. I’m super happy for everyone who can spend 100s of dollars a month on books but that isn’t everyone and that’s okay!

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  3. I’m kind of in the same boat as you! I buy books when I can, but books are so expensive and I’m living in my first real world out of college apartment, and apartments are small…I already have four bookcases. The apartment living room/kitchen divider thing is now a shelf for my TBR books. There’s like 25 physical books I think.

    The rest of my TBR books are Kindle books because Kindle books are cheaper… and even with that I’ve actually been checking out library ebooks from Overdrive. And I’m lucky enough to have a library that actually purchases what I recommend almost weekly sometimes. I think I usually get the latest newly released book I want within a month. It just takes a lot of patience for those books. And I get the ebook ARC’s from Netgalley. This just saves so much space. But I have discovered Book Outlet recently. That’s kind of why my TBR shelf got moved to the living room/kitchen divider.

    But yessss it is super hard to have a bookstagram with limited books and pretty bookcases. But I’ve learned how to manage a bookstagram account. My numbers aren’t the greatest, but they are decent and I am trying not to buy physical books just for the sake of bookstagram. I’m the one that has to enjoy the format that I’m reading and I prefer ebooks most of the time. I also enjoy the content that I put out now and try not to compete with everybody else’s bookshelves because I’ve got bills, rent, groceries to pay for, etc.

    I do still buy books mostly because there’s a part of me that knows that ebooks are just unlimited licenses until the company that owes them sees fit to hit that delete button or whatever that happens. I want to have my favorites in a physical copy if that should ever happen. It’s just like insurance to me. But I still don’t want to spend too much there, which is why I am happy with Book Outlet. On my last Book Outlet order I spent $37.11 TOTAL for NINE books. I can’t do that at my used bookstore even because young adult books at the used bookstore here are about 9-11 dollars still unless they have been out longer. Then they might be under $5 sometimes.

    Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I’m sorry you feel this way, but I also get it. I feel this way often (even though I do have 3 bookshelves of books). On bookstagram I can’t even fathom how many books people have!? Since my lifestyle has changed (went from 2 incomes, to 1 so I could stay home with babe) I have taken an intense love for my library and appreciate it so much. I still buy a few books a month, but keep to a budget. Or this year, I’ve been fortunate to only use gift cards so far for purchases. You’re still a reader and a reviewer regardless of what others think! It’s unfair of our bookish community to deem it otherwise. Reading opportunities come in SO MANY formats. It shouldn’t matter whether we personally own the book or not (though I feel we’re all made to believe otherwise).

    Loved this post, and resonate to it on so many levels. Thank you for your thoughts!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. omg yes to everything in this post!!!!! I totally and completely agree with everything you say. I never understood the whole “buying multiple versions of the same book”. Like, you already own the book? Isn’t that enough?

    ALSO the owning unread books and STILL buying more books. I mean, I have several unread books at home and some times I still buy more books. And I’m definitely guilty of buying books because I like the cover. BUT I try to always read the books I have before buying other books, and I always buy books I *know* I’m going to read. And most of the books I own are books I got as gifts. I don’t think I’ve ever bought a book *just* because of the cover, I always have to be actually interested in the book. It doesn’t make any sense to me to just,,, have books? Doesn’t that stress you out to have so many books to read and never reading them?

    And I HATE how there’s such a trend in the book world to own a ton of books. Not everyone can own books! Not everyone has access to books! And I totally agree with what you said about the newest releases. It’s honestly such a privilege to be able to read, let alone own, new reads.

    Sorry for the essay, I just really loved this post and everything you had to say.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m so glad you agree! Yes, it’s so crazy (and ngl a little annoying) when I’m dying to just be able to read a book from the library and have to wait months for my hold to be ready, meanwhile some other people have like three editions of the same book, two of them never read. I appreciate each and every one of the books I’ve read, and most of them I’ve read multiple times, and then there are people who don’t even know how many unread books they have? Thanks for commenting; I loved reading your essay 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Great post!!

    I definitely fell for the materialistic side of book blogging back when I was 16. Yeah, I bought majorly used book, but when books are only $4… that tends to add up >.< And back then I didn't have access to a library either…

    Two years later, I for sure don't buy as many books, my library is my best friend XD But even back then, any book that I did buy, I make sure I will read at some point, I can't waste that money XD

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  7. I can relate to all of this post so so much! You shouldn’t have to worry about spending money to do something you enjoy and it’s sad that a lot of things within blogging have to rely on getting new books. I’m a student and definitely can’t afford brand new books as soon as they come out, I have to wait till they’ve been reduced! Which, sadly, usually means the hype has died but so what?

    It should be about the quality of your review not just about how soon you wrote it after it came out. You could be writing about a book weeks or months after it has released but if your review is original and insightful then that’s what matters!

    I think there’s something beautiful about book borrowing , it’s yours while your in that world then you come out the other side and pass it on to someone else. I mean if you think about it, the whole idea of owning books is a little bit pointless, like yeah it’s nice to have them but once you’ve read it, it just collects dust! All in all, don’t let this get you down, keep doing what you’re doing and f*ck anyone who thinks it isn’t good enough, basically! hahahah Xxx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So glad you can relate 🙂 Yeah, if anything not buying books has taught me to have patience in life 🙂 I completely agree! Knowing the copy of a book I’ve read has been read by many other people feels kind of cool and special instead of just reading a book once (or never reading it if it’s a cover buy!!) and then letting it collect dust

      Liked by 1 person

  8. AH YES THIS! Kay, this is such a wonderful post. *virtually hugs you* I agree with everything you said! Before I started my first job last summer, I owned less than 20 YA books. I unfortunately didn’t have access to a steady income, so there was no way I could afford buying many books!

    I never understood the buying multiple versions of book hype too. Even now, the only new releases I own, were either gifted to me or won in giveaways. I primarily read e books, and utilize my local library (which I’m so grateful to have easy access to!)

    I also think it’s such a shame how there’s a common assumption that the only way to support an author is through purchasing their book. As reviewers, we can still help generate hype, and do our part by reading, talking about, and promoting novels!

    Love, love, love this post, girl! ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Oh my god I’m so glad someone has spoken about this!! I see people have wishlists for different copies of the SAME BOOK?! Just so they can have a full set or a limited edition cover. Even though they’ve already read it. I don’t understand it at all! I’m also a teen and I have a part time job but there’s no way I’ll be spending my money on brand new books that have gorgeous covers but crap stories. I use my library so often that everyone who works there knows my name. Libraries are honestly the greatest. Thank you so much for writing about this 🙂 I constantly feel like I’m not good enough as a blogger because I don’t have many books.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I definitely agree there’s too much focus on consumerism and materialism in the bookish community. I think as long as people are reading books, it doesn’t matter how you’re getting them or how many you own – you’re still a bookworm and shouldn’t be made to feel less of one because you aren’t buying them all the time.
    Personally, I do own a lot of books, but a lot of them are second-hand that I bought for 99p off eBay or from a charity shop, and every birthday, anniversary and Christmas my boyfriend buys me a Waterstones voucher, which is when I buy any special editions or new releases I want (which is why I do have to admit I own a lot of unread books – I buy them when I have a voucher and then often don’t feel like reading them for a while!).
    Even with a full-time job I don’t have the money to be buying books constantly, and definitely back when I was a teenager there’s no way I’d have been able to, so I totally relate.
    Great post! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Don’t let anyone tell you you aren’t a real reader for taking out books from the library and not buying tons of books. Most of those “how big of a book nerd are you” things include ridiculous things like you have read while driving anyway. They aren’t a marker for ‘real’ readers. I see you constantly putting out reviews, and that means you’re a real reader because you’re reading.

    I really do see the problem with consumerism in the book community, and I definitely contribute to it. I’m in a unique and fortunate position to have parents who are huge readers, so I’ve always gotten books as gifts or gift cards. Those gift cards are what allow me to actually read books. I can’t get most ARCs as an international reader, and I’m a germaphobe so using the library isn’t an option. I buy 99% of books I have with gift cards.

    On having a ton of unread books, I haven’t been able to physically read in a while because of school. I can tell you that having 2 boxes on unread books is 100% more stressful than glamorous. I want to get to them, but I just haven’t had time.

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  12. These are such great points, especially since I am about finished with my first year of college and totally understand the money issues as a high school and college student. Before college, I went to the library all the time, and got most of my books from there. I would only buy favorites or ones that I knew I really wanted to read, and even then I would buy them used or from somewhere that sells them at a discount. I also don’t have nearly as many books as some bloggers and bookstagrammers, and it sometimes makes me feel like I’m not a “real” blogger, when the amount of books or merch I own shouldn’t be a factor in that. Also, it is really unfortunate that others sometimes make us feel like we aren’t supporting authors if we don’t buy their book and instead use the library or an ARC, because book blogging is all about supporting books and authors and it seems it has taken a different turn lately. Anyways, this is a much needed topic of discussion, and you did a great job! 😄

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I’m making an effort to not spend money on books or a while, only if they’re audiobooks (since I already get monthly credits), kindle deals, and if I’m going to an author event. I’m pretty ashamed of they amount of money I spent in attempts to bookstagram. Props are NOT cheap my friend, ahaha.

    This is a great post, Kay!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I definitely think there’s no shame in saving your money. If you have a good library nearby, why not use it? It’s great to be able to buy books, but I have way too many books right now. I get ebooks or library copies now unless I know I’m going to love it. But we might be moving and what am I going to do with hundreds of books?

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  15. For the most part, I actually borrow E-books from the library so I can read them on my tablet. It makes them more portable and lighter. It’s also cost effective. I’m extra lucky in that I have access to two incredible library systems. If there is a book I really want, mostly plays actually, I will buy those but plays are usually 8 or 9 dollars nothing like a 20 dollar hardcover book.

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  16. I read the whole thing! And looking at the other comments lots of us did 😉 Its a super important topic and I am glad you decided to go through with the post 🙂 I do a lot of those “outrageous” things, but I have only been able to do them recently. When I was a teenager 99% of the books I read I got from the library, so I get it. Everyone is in a different situation in life and we can’t judge each other based on it! Its important to remember that not everyone can buy all the books. And other’s may be able to but may choose to spend their money in other ways! Just because you can’t / don’t spend a lot of money on books doesn’t mean you aren’t a true bookworm! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Thanks for this post ❤ I think it means more that you only spend money on the books you love and know you will want to read again and again. Books are expensive. I feel the same way. If I wanted to buy every new book that came out I would go bankrupt. It's not the number of books you own that makes you a bookworm but the love of reading!! And by blogging and reviewing books you are definitely supporting all the authors you talk about, which is great and you have no reason to feel shamed. Thank you for being open and honest!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Gosh I so relate to this post!! I totally get what you mean about not getting different editions of books so that they all match- especially since I have so many second hand books that I’d be super lucky to find any matching series/books at all. And I can’t imagine getting an extra copy of a book when I already have one? Surely if I have that money to spare I’d just buy a different book instead? Wowee $200 on books- I feel like I’ve spent a lot on the rare occasion when I splash out on £20 worth of books 😂 I do always have some unread physical books- but that’s mostly cos I go to the library a lot. I’m always behind on new releases as well and I definitely couldn’t do the whole bookstagram thing either. That’s so bad that people shame you like that! And yeah I think it’s really bad when this is applied to teens as well (although like you said, this applies to a lot of non-teens as well- especially considering I’m not a teen) Anyway great discussion to have!

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  19. I see a lot of consumerism in the book blogging community, as well. And I think it’s fine if people want to spend their money on books, especially as that keeps publishers afloat to keep bringing us more books! But there does seem to be an underlying assumption that EVERYONE has a bunch of money lying around to buy books. I don’t. I don’t buy myself books, generally. I go to the library instead. And that’s great, too, because supporting the library helps them buy books to give equal access to more people. There’s more than one way to support books and authors–and no one should feel shamed for the way they chose or the way that works best for them.

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  20. I enjoyed this post. It spoket to me, because I agree entirely with using the library as a means to get and read books. I belong to a mystery book club, and we only choose books that are in good supply in the library system, as well as available on kindle. Good for you, Kay! Elaine LaBrizzi, “The Courageous Consumer”

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  21. Completely agree with all your points except for the part about going on a book spending spree. I wonder if it’s down to Asian values as a whole? We learn to save our money and try not to be too frivolous. Book sprees = only from second-hand bookstores and charity shops, but I definitely occasionally buy books from larger retailers if it really grabs my eye, but this is rare. Great discussion.

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  22. I definitely agree that you don’t have to buy the book if you get sent an ARC just to support the author! You’re supporting the author when you read the book and tell your friends about it! I review an ARC every week, and I’ve bought exactly 2 of the books I’ve previewed. There are a few authors I’d buy finished copies of even if I got an ARC, but they’re a very select group (and I’ve never got an ARC from any of them anyway).

    I have to admit, I’m a sucker for $2 Kindle book sales. I’d rather pay $2 for a book now than $10 on a book later. But I’m fortunate (and this is just recent for me) in that I get a certain amount of money each month to spend on things I want (and I put a lot of that money in my Amazon account, so I always have money there). But my boy has less money for me (he saved his money for like 6 months so he could buy a Nintendo Switch game… so proud of him for that).

    You’re definitely not less of a reader if your book budget is smaller. And most authors love when readers get their books at libraries! Libraries are great!

    Liked by 1 person

  23. YES TO THIS WHOLE POST.
    I’m here after reading your shelf tour and I’m so happy I clicked that link because this post literally sums up exactly how I feel. I personally tend to buy ebooks because I prefer that over physical books and they’re so much cheaper which means I can buy more books!! As a teenager, I really don’t want to be spending so much money on one book when I can get maybe 2/3 ebooks for the same price?? It just doesn’t make sense to me. This does mean I can miss out on new releases as either they aren’t available from kindle/amazon from the get go or are the same price as a physical book (no thank you) – but with a huge tbr list I’m happy to wait haha.
    I hate how having so many books is such a trend and seen as almost a requirement which I don’t understand?? It doesn’t make you any less of a bookworm if you don’t own the book??
    I feel like drowning in ARCs is also seen as a bookworm requirement, but as a newbie blogger and who also is under the NetGalley age (I’m 16) I don’t really know how! Doesn’t make me any less of a bookworm – and what about those without bookish social media?
    Loved this post Kay!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I remember as a teen I was also very broke, I often get a £5 spending money a week so to have £20 for a cinema trip and snacks, i’d have to save for 4 weeks straight. Now I remember at that time I only had Twilight books (gifted as presents), Harry Potter books, and my beloved Heartland and Horses of Half Moon books which I usually save for or ask as presents, so yeah I think it’s mostly young adults who buy so much books. I’ve only just started to buy books like 2 years ago and was actually getting them secondhand, but this year is the first year where I’m able to pre-order all my anticipated releases and I guess I also have such a lovely boyfriend who pays for my Fairyloot box and the occasional pre-orders here and there (I say this while knowing I have an amazon order of book 2 & 3 of the illustrated Harry Potter books that he decided he wanted to buy, also telling me he wants to pay for 5 of my pre-orders that comes out next week). I probably shouldn’t buy so many books but I feel like I’m so behind so I’m playing catch up? but then I’m renovating my spare room into a library so I justify that as it’s okay to do that haha

    Like

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